Crappie Stir Fry

8-10 ounces crappie fillets, chopped
3 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup green onions, diced
1 cup fresh mushrooms, diced
1 cup fresh asparagus, diced
1 cup green bell pepper, diced
1/2 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
1 garlic clove, minced
2 tablespoons teriyaki sauce
Cooked rice or noodles (follow package directions)
Heat wok or skillet and canola oil. When hot add and stir all the ingredients except the rice/noodles. Stir fry until fish is done. Toss rice/noodles and serve with desired sauce (soy, chili etc).

 

Jambalaya Grits

 

2 tablespoons bacon grease

2 tablespoons flour

1/2 cup chopped onion

1 chopped green pepper

1/2 cup chopped celery

1 cup quick grits crumbled

1 cup peeled and chopped fresh tomatoes

1 cup ground ham
Cooked bacon
In a heavy skillet, heat bacon grease and gradually add flour, stirring constantly until roux becomes light brown. Add onion, green pepper and celery and cook 5 minutes. Cook grits according to package directions and add to roux. Add tomatoes and ham. Sprinkle with bacon and serve immediately.

Fish Cakes

This is a fast way to used leftover fish for a scrumptious breakfast or for snacks when fishing. For breakfast, I prefer honey, you may rather have ketchup. If you’re on the water, just eat’em – you don’t have time for condiments.

 

1 cup of fish leftover fish (or put a few raw pieces in the microwave to cook)

1/2 cup mashed potatoes

1/2 chopped onion

Garlic salt to taste

Cajun Seasoning

Cornmeal

Ketchup or honey optional

Mix fish, potatoes, and onion with some garlic salt and a little Red Fish Seasoning. Shape into patties, roll in cornmeal and fry. Serve with ketchups or honey.

 

Onion Soup

 

1/2 pound sliced white onions

1/4 cup butter

2 tablespoons corn oil

3 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 quart chicken broth

1 quart beef broth

8 slices French bread

Shredded Swiss cheese

Grated Parmesan

Sauté onions in butter and oil until onions are transparent, but not well browned. When tender, turn heat to lowest point and sprinkle with flour, stirring vigorously. Pour into Dutch oven and stir in broth. Heat thoroughly and divide among 8 oven-proof bowls. Float a slice of bread atop each serving. Mix equal parts of cheese to smooth paste and spread over bread. Place all bowls on oven rack 4 inches from broiler. Broil until cheese melts. Serve at once.

 

Honey-Baked Wild Christmas Turkey

The wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), native to North America, is the heaviest member of the galliformes (chicken, grouse, quail, pheasant). There are about 256 species are worldwide. Turkeys, especially males, are known for their long, dark, fan-shaped tail and glossy bronze wings. The male is substantially larger than the female and his feathers have areas of red, green, copper, bronze, and gold iridescence. Female feathers are duller overall, in shades of brown and gray.

Males typically have a beard consisting of modified feathers that stick out from the breast. Beards average nine inches long. In some populations, 10 to 20 percent of females have a beard (you aren’t held responsible for shooting a hen in drag) and are usually shorter and thinner than the male. The average weight of the adult male is 18 pounds and the adult female is eight pounds. The record-sized adult male wild turkey is 30 pounds, whereas a big domestic turkey approaches 82 pounds.

Every hunter I’ve asked about cooking wild turkey drumsticks says they don’t because there is so little meat there; just a lot of ligaments. The breast is all that reaches their tables.

 

10- to 12-pound wild turkey

6 tablespoons honey

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon coarse black pepper

Stuffing (see below)

3/4 cup chopped onion

2 cups white wine

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 teaspoon parsley flakes

1 stick melted butter

1 teaspoon Creole seasoning

Brush turkey with warm honey and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place on rack in large baking pan. Place stuffing in turkey. Mix onion, wine, broth, and parsley, and then add butter and Creole seasoning. Baste bird with mixture. Place in oven and roast at 325 degrees for 4 hours, basting, occasionally with wine mixture.